- Home


Air Conditioners | Dehumidifiers | Dishwashers | Disposals | Dryers | Freezers | Humidifiers | Ice Makers | Microwave Ovens | Ovens, Ranges, Stoves | Refrigerators | Trash Compactors | Washers | Water Filters

FAQs | Contact | Apprenticeship | Parts | Model Number Help | Newsletter | Beer

Find Appliance Parts & Diagrams Here
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.

365-day return policy on all parts ordered through this site!


 Moderated by: BrntToast, RegUS_PatOff, appl.tech.29501 Search Our Sites for More Info!
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
GE refrigerator PFS22SISBSS  Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Apr 28th, 2011 05:38 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
ourstocks2002
Merit Apprentice Appliantologist
 

Joined: Wed Aug 19th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 11
Flavorite Brew: Molson Golden
Status: 
Offline
Hi Folks,

 

This is similar to the previous topic "GE refrigerator PFS22SISBSS 2006 Compressor testing"  I got some good info from that topic.

 

I have a GE PFS22SISBSS refrigerator.  The compressor is not coming on but I hear clicking.  I did some testing:  J2 on motherboard, 3-8 13.5VDC, 3-4 13.5 VDC, 3-5 13.5 VDC (may be high, expecting 12 VDC).  I checked compressor leads, top two 14 Ohms, bottom and top left 5.5 Ohms, bottom and top right 8 Ohms (seem good).  The capacitor reads infinity Ohms (OL) and does not really read a capacitance; it reads 3 pF, rated for 12 microF, nothing looks bad on it, no bulges, etc.

 

I called called GE customer service, they are sending me a new motherboard since it is covered under the recall.  They offered to cap installation cost at $100 BUT there are no GE techs (GE employees) in this area.  So they said they would pay $100 to a GE certified tech for the install but I would have to pay the balance should it be over $100.  Anyway, in the mean time, since the mother board appears to be ok (13.55 VDC is higher than the 12VDC but I don't think that would cause issue, not sure), I figured I would press forward with other troubleshooting/repairs so that I can get this back on line ASAP. 

 

Any help would be appreciated!

 

Thanks!!

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Fri Apr 29th, 2011 09:22 pm
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
ourstocks2002
Merit Apprentice Appliantologist
 

Joined: Wed Aug 19th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 11
Flavorite Brew: Molson Golden
Status: 
Offline
Hi Folks,

Installed new motherboard, no dice. I think that the issue is the capacitor. It ready such a small capacitance 3pF and the meter does not move when resistance checking. I am trying to get my hands on a replacement, looks like it will be after the weekend, another 3-4 days with no fridge.... I am considering getting any ol 12microF capacitor and using it until the "official" part arrives. We'll see... Post more as things progress....

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue May 3rd, 2011 07:27 pm
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
ourstocks2002
Merit Apprentice Appliantologist
 

Joined: Wed Aug 19th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 11
Flavorite Brew: Molson Golden
Status: 
Offline
Hi Folks,

I found the wiring diagram for the GE PSF22SISBSS, see attached.  I will put another post with info. 

I had just typed up the whole thing and when I posted it, the site said file too big, all my text was gone and not posted.  I wish it would have gone forward with the text and simply dropped the attachment if too big, oh well.

Thanks,

Attachment: PSF22SISBSS - Wiring Diagram.pdf (Downloaded 0 times)

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue May 3rd, 2011 07:48 pm
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
ourstocks2002
Merit Apprentice Appliantologist
 

Joined: Wed Aug 19th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 11
Flavorite Brew: Molson Golden
Status: 
Offline
Ok, now for progress notes.

Studying the wiring diagram showed that the capacitor is a run capacitor and not a start capacitor so I decided to check it again since it was NOT the reason that the compressor was not starting. This time I used the correct terminals on my multimeter (oops), it measured at 12uF. Capacitor is good.


The wiring diagram shows that the compressor common get powered with a hot wire and the start and run/main terminals get neutral. Knowing that the overload was working fine (this is what is making the click after the humm when the compressor is "locked rotor" and drawing high amps) it would protect the motor from overload. So, all I needed to do to get the compressor to come on it put neutral (or ground) to the start pin of the compressor at start-up. I used a light switch, a junction box, power strip/bar, and wire from an old appliance.

I plugged the power bar/strip into the wall outlet. With the power bar/strip off, I plugged my wire into the power bar. I put a wire nut on the hot (black) wire of my wire just in case the power bar/strip was swtiched on "reset". I wired the neutral (white) through the switch and mounted the switch on the junction box. I removed the capacity from the relay/overload assembly and wrapped the free end neutral wire and wrapped it around the "blade" that corresponds to the start winding on the compressor. I then installed the capacitor back into the relay/overload assembly.

Incidently, another way to remember which windings have the highest resistance is to think about the amount of use. The run/main winding run "all the time" so they have more copper in them compared to the start windings. More copper means less resistance. Less copper, more resistance. If you have seen resistance values for motors you will see that the resistance drops as the motor gets bigger for the same reason.

I plugged the refrigerator in and heard the hum. I switched the neutral and the compressor started. I quickly switched the neutral back off and the compressor stayed on, success!! I decided that I would leave it run and shut it self off when the temp in the fridge and freezer reached setpoint. When it shut off, I unplugged it to prevent it from trying to come back on without me being there to neutral boost it back on. I am using a wireless thermometer to monitor the temperature and turn it back on every now and then. I will get the new PTC/overload tomorrow but at least I have refrigeration until then.

I hope that this info helps some. If you try to do similar, please be sure to review your unit wiring diagram AND validate the diagram with your multimeter to know what wires to what, etc. Also, be sure to use common sense and safe practices. If you are not sure, don't do it!!!

Good luck!!

Thanks!

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

Current time is 09:55 am Tell a friend about this page... all your other friends are doing it!  
- > Do-It-Yourself Appliance Repair Help > The Kitchen Appliance Repair Forum > GE refrigerator PFS22SISBSS Top



Find Appliance Parts & Diagrams Here
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.

365-day return policy on all parts ordered through this site!

FAQs | Contact | Apprenticeship | Parts | Model Number Help | Newsletter | Beer

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
- Home
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly, spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.0828 seconds (21% database + 79% PHP). 25 queries executed.

Web Analytics